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This is ESP-blurb formatted text. For the first time since 1997, the Electronic Scholarly Publishing Project has received a complete facelift. All of the old content and functionality have been preserved, now wrapped in a new look. New features and content have also been added.

This is ESP-abstract formatted data. The parallel between the behavior of the chromosomes in reduction and that of Mendelian factors in segregation was first pointed out by Sutton (1902) though earlier in the same year Boveri (1902) had referred to a possible connection. In this paper and others Boveri brought forward considerable evidence from the field of experimental embryology indicating that the chromosomes play an important role in development and inheritance. The first attempt at connecting any given somatic character with a definite chromosome came with McClung's (1902) suggestion that the accessory chromosome is a sex-determiner. Stevens (1905) and Wilson (1905) verified this by showing that in numerous forms there is a sex chromosome, present in all the eggs and in the female-producing sperm, but absent, or represented by a smaller homologue, in the male-producing sperm. A further step was made when Morgan (1910) showed that the factor for color in the eyes of the fly Drosophila ampelophila follows the distribution of the sex chromosome already found in the same species by Stevens (1908). Later, on the appearance of a sex-linked wing mutation in Drosophila, Morgan (1910a, 1911) was able to make clear a new point. By crossing white-eyed, long-winged flies to those with red eyes and rudimentary wings (the new sex-linked character) he obtained, in F2, white-eyed, rudimentary-winged flies.

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Hello —this is ESP-pop-cap formatted text. The parallel between the behavior of the chromosomes in reduction and that of Mendelian factors in segregation was first pointed out by Sutton (1902) though earlier in the same year Boveri (1902) had referred to a possible connection. In this paper and others Boveri brought forward considerable evidence from the field of experimental embryology indicating that the chromosomes play an important role in development and inheritance. The first attempt at connecting any given somatic character with a definite chromosome came with McClung's (1902) suggestion that the accessory chromosome is a sex-determiner. Stevens (1905) and Wilson (1905) verified this by showing that in numerous forms there is a sex chromosome, present in all the eggs and in the female-producing sperm, but absent, or represented by a smaller homologue, in the male-producing sperm. A further step was made when Morgan (1910) showed that the factor for color in the eyes of the fly Drosophila ampelophila follows the distribution of the sex chromosome already found in the same species by Stevens (1908). Later, on the appearance of a sex-linked wing mutation in Drosophila, Morgan (1910a, 1911) was able to make clear a new point. By crossing white-eyed, long-winged flies to those with red eyes and rudimentary wings (the new sex-linked character) he obtained, in F2, white-eyed, rudimentary-winged flies.

This is ESP-standard formatted text. The parallel between the behavior of the chromosomes in reduction and that of Mendelian factors in segregation was first pointed out by Sutton (1902) though earlier in the same year Boveri (1902) had referred to a possible connection. In this paper and others Boveri brought forward considerable evidence from the field of experimental embryology indicating that the chromosomes play an important role in development and inheritance. The first attempt at connecting any given somatic character with a definite chromosome came with McClung's (1902) suggestion that the accessory chromosome is a sex-determiner. Stevens (1905) and Wilson (1905) verified this by showing that in numerous forms there is a sex chromosome, present in all the eggs and in the female-producing sperm, but absent, or represented by a smaller homologue, in the male-producing sperm. A further step was made when Morgan (1910) showed that the factor for color in the eyes of the fly Drosophila ampelophila follows the distribution of the sex chromosome already found in the same species by Stevens (1908). Later, on the appearance of a sex-linked wing mutation in Drosophila, Morgan (1910a, 1911) was able to make clear a new point. By crossing white-eyed, long-winged flies to those with red eyes and rudimentary wings (the new sex-linked character) he obtained, in F2, white-eyed, rudimentary-winged flies.

This paragraph is for testing superscripts and subscripts, as in F1 or F2 or F3 or x2. The parallel between the Σδ behavior of the chromosomes in F2 reduction and that of Mendelian factors in segregation was first pointed out by Sutton (1902) though earlier in the same year Boveri (1902) had referred to a possible connection.

This is ESP-b1 formatted text. The parallel between the behavior of the chromosomes in reduction and that of Mendelian factors in segregation was first pointed out by Sutton (1902) though earlier in the same year Boveri (1902) had referred to a possible connection.

This is ESP-b1 formatted text (continued). The parallel between the behavior of the chromosomes in reduction and that of Mendelian factors in segregation was first pointed out by Sutton (1902) though earlier in the same year Boveri (1902) had referred to a possible connection.

9. This is ESP-b2 formatted text. The parallel between the behavior of the chromosomes in reduction and that of Mendelian factors in segregation was first pointed out by Sutton (1902) though earlier in the same year Boveri (1902) had referred to a possible connection.

This is ESP-b2 formatted text (continued). The parallel between the behavior of the chromosomes in reduction and that of Mendelian factors in segregation was first pointed out by Sutton (1902) though earlier in the same year Boveri (1902) had referred to a possible connection.

9999. This is ESP-b3 formatted text. The parallel between the behavior of the chromosomes in reduction and that of Mendelian factors in segregation was first pointed out by Sutton (1902) though earlier in the same year Boveri (1902) had referred to a possible connection.

This is ESP-b3 formatted text (continued). The parallel between the behavior of the chromosomes in reduction and that of Mendelian factors in segregation was first pointed out by Sutton (1902) though earlier in the same year Boveri (1902) had referred to a possible connection.

This is ESP-standard formatted text. The parallel between the behavior of the chromosomes in reduction and that of Mendelian factors in segregation was first pointed out by Sutton (1902) though earlier in the same year Boveri (1902) had referred to a possible connection. In this paper and others Boveri brought forward considerable evidence from the field of experimental embryology indicating that the chromosomes play an important role in development and inheritance. The first attempt at connecting any given somatic character with a definite chromosome came with McClung's (1902) suggestion that the accessory chromosome is a sex-determiner. Stevens (1905) and Wilson (1905) verified this by showing that in numerous forms there is a sex chromosome, present in all the eggs and in the female-producing sperm, but absent, or represented by a smaller homologue, in the male-producing sperm. A further step was made when Morgan (1910) showed that the factor for color in the eyes of the fly Drosophila ampelophila follows the distribution of the sex chromosome already found in the same species by Stevens (1908). Later, on the appearance of a sex-linked wing mutation in Drosophila, Morgan (1910a, 1911) was able to make clear a new point. By crossing white-eyed, long-winged flies to those with red eyes and rudimentary wings (the new sex-linked character) he obtained, in F2, white-eyed, rudimentary-winged flies.

This is ESP-quote formatted text. The parallel between the behavior of the chromosomes in reduction and that of Mendelian factors in segregation was first pointed out by Sutton (1902) though earlier in the same year Boveri (1902) had referred to a possible connection. In this paper and others Boveri brought forward considerable evidence from the field of experimental embryology indicating that the chromosomes play an important role in development and inheritance. The first attempt at connecting any given somatic character with a definite chromosome came with McClung's (1902) suggestion that the accessory chromosome is a sex-determiner. Stevens (1905) and Wilson (1905) verified this by showing that in numerous forms there is a sex chromosome, present in all the eggs and in the female-producing sperm, but absent, or represented by a smaller homologue, in the male-producing sperm. A further step was made when Morgan (1910) showed that the factor for color in the eyes of the fly Drosophila ampelophila follows the distribution of the sex chromosome already found in the same species by Stevens (1908). Later, on the appearance of a sex-linked wing mutation in Drosophila, Morgan (1910a, 1911) was able to make clear a new point. By crossing white-eyed, long-winged flies to those with red eyes and rudimentary wings (the new sex-linked character) he obtained, in F2, white-eyed, rudimentary-winged flies.

ESP-quote-source

This is ESP-standard formatted text. The parallel between the behavior of the chromosomes in reduction and that of Mendelian factors in segregation was first pointed out by Sutton (1902) though earlier in the same year Boveri (1902) had referred to a possible connection. In this paper and others Boveri brought forward considerable evidence from the field of experimental embryology indicating that the chromosomes play an important role in development and inheritance. The first attempt at connecting any given somatic character with a definite chromosome came with McClung's (1902) suggestion that the accessory chromosome is a sex-determiner. Stevens (1905) and Wilson (1905) verified this by showing that in numerous forms there is a sex chromosome, present in all the eggs and in the female-producing sperm, but absent, or represented by a smaller homologue, in the male-producing sperm. A further step was made when Morgan (1910) showed that the factor for color in the eyes of the fly Drosophila ampelophila follows the distribution of the sex chromosome already found in the same species by Stevens (1908). Later, on the appearance of a sex-linked wing mutation in Drosophila, Morgan (1910a, 1911) was able to make clear a new point. By crossing white-eyed, long-winged flies to those with red eyes and rudimentary wings (the new sex-linked character) he obtained, in F2, white-eyed, rudimentary-winged flies.

This demonstrates ESP PULL-QUOTE Right

This is ESP-standard formatted text. The parallel between the behavior of the chromosomes in reduction and that of Mendelian factors in segregation was first pointed out by Sutton (1902) though earlier in the same year Boveri (1902) had referred to a possible connection. In this paper and others Boveri brought forward considerable evidence from the field of experimental embryology indicating that the chromosomes play an important role in development and inheritance. The first attempt at connecting any given somatic character with a definite chromosome came with McClung's (1902) suggestion that the accessory chromosome is a sex-determiner. Stevens (1905) and Wilson (1905) verified this by showing that in numerous forms there is a sex chromosome, present in all the eggs and in the female-producing sperm, but absent, or represented by a smaller homologue, in the male-producing sperm. A further step was made when Morgan (1910) showed that the factor for color in the eyes of the fly Drosophila ampelophila follows the distribution of the sex chromosome already found in the same species by Stevens (1908). Later, on the appearance of a sex-linked wing mutation in Drosophila, Morgan (1910a, 1911) was able to make clear a new point. By crossing white-eyed, long-winged flies to those with red eyes and rudimentary wings (the new sex-linked character) he obtained, in F2, white-eyed, rudimentary-winged flies.

This demonstrates ESP PULL-QUOTE Left

This is ESP-standard formatted text. The parallel between the behavior of the chromosomes in reduction and that of Mendelian factors in segregation was first pointed out by Sutton (1902) though earlier in the same year Boveri (1902) had referred to a possible connection. In this paper and others Boveri brought forward considerable evidence from the field of experimental embryology indicating that the chromosomes play an important role in development and inheritance. The first attempt at connecting any given somatic character with a definite chromosome came with McClung's (1902) suggestion that the accessory chromosome is a sex-determiner. Stevens (1905) and Wilson (1905) verified this by showing that in numerous forms there is a sex chromosome, present in all the eggs and in the female-producing sperm, but absent, or represented by a smaller homologue, in the male-producing sperm. A further step was made when Morgan (1910) showed that the factor for color in the eyes of the fly Drosophila ampelophila follows the distribution of the sex chromosome already found in the same species by Stevens (1908). Later, on the appearance of a sex-linked wing mutation in Drosophila, Morgan (1910a, 1911) was able to make clear a new point. By crossing white-eyed, long-winged flies to those with red eyes and rudimentary wings (the new sex-linked character) he obtained, in F2, white-eyed, rudimentary-winged flies.

bateson-and-punnett

Figure x. This is ESP figure-caption formatted text. Reginald Punnett and William Bateson, relaxing on the bench.

This is ESP-standard formatted text. The parallel between the behavior of the chromosomes in reduction and that of Mendelian factors in segregation was first pointed out by Sutton (1902) though earlier in the same year Boveri (1902) had referred to a possible connection. In this paper and others Boveri brought forward considerable evidence from the field of experimental embryology indicating that the chromosomes play an important role in development and inheritance. The first attempt at connecting any given somatic character with a definite chromosome came with McClung's (1902) suggestion that the accessory chromosome is a sex-determiner. Stevens (1905) and Wilson (1905) verified this by showing that in numerous forms there is a sex chromosome, present in all the eggs and in the female-producing sperm, but absent, or represented by a smaller homologue, in the male-producing sperm. A further step was made when Morgan (1910) showed that the factor for color in the eyes of the fly Drosophila ampelophila follows the distribution of the sex chromosome already found in the same species by Stevens (1908). Later, on the appearance of a sex-linked wing mutation in Drosophila, Morgan (1910a, 1911) was able to make clear a new point. By crossing white-eyed, long-winged flies to those with red eyes and rudimentary wings (the new sex-linked character) he obtained, in F2, white-eyed, rudimentary-winged flies.

Hello —this is ESP-pop-cap formatted text. The parallel between the behavior of the chromosomes in reduction and that of Mendelian factors in segregation was first pointed out by Sutton (1902) though earlier in the same year Boveri (1902) had referred to a possible connection. In this paper and others Boveri brought forward considerable evidence from the field of experimental embryology indicating that the chromosomes play an important role in development and inheritance. The first attempt at connecting any given somatic character with a definite chromosome came with McClung's (1902) suggestion that the accessory chromosome is a sex-determiner. Stevens (1905) and Wilson (1905) verified this by showing that in numerous forms there is a sex chromosome, present in all the eggs and in the female-producing sperm, but absent, or represented by a smaller homologue, in the male-producing sperm. A further step was made when Morgan (1910) showed that the factor for color in the eyes of the fly Drosophila ampelophila follows the distribution of the sex chromosome already found in the same species by Stevens (1908). Later, on the appearance of a sex-linked wing mutation in Drosophila, Morgan (1910a, 1911) was able to make clear a new point. By crossing white-eyed, long-winged flies to those with red eyes and rudimentary wings (the new sex-linked character) he obtained, in F2, white-eyed, rudimentary-winged flies.

This is ESP-standard formatted text. The parallel between the behavior of the chromosomes in reduction and that of Mendelian factors in segregation was first pointed out by Sutton (1902) though earlier in the same year Boveri (1902) had referred to a possible connection. In this paper and others Boveri brought forward considerable evidence from the field of experimental embryology indicating that the chromosomes play an important role in development and inheritance. The first attempt at connecting any given somatic character with a definite chromosome came with McClung's (1902) suggestion that the accessory chromosome is a sex-determiner. Stevens (1905) and Wilson (1905) verified this by showing that in numerous forms there is a sex chromosome, present in all the eggs and in the female-producing sperm, but absent, or represented by a smaller homologue, in the male-producing sperm. A further step was made when Morgan (1910) showed that the factor for color in the eyes of the fly Drosophila ampelophila follows the distribution of the sex chromosome already found in the same species by Stevens (1908). Later, on the appearance of a sex-linked wing mutation in Drosophila, Morgan (1910a, 1911) was able to make clear a new point. By crossing white-eyed, long-winged flies to those with red eyes and rudimentary wings (the new sex-linked character) he obtained, in F2, white-eyed, rudimentary-winged flies.

bateson and johannsen in the garden

William Bateson (right) in his garden in Merton, England, with Wilhelm Johannsen, 1924.

This is ESP-standard formatted text. The parallel between the behavior of the chromosomes in reduction and that of Mendelian factors in segregation was first pointed out by Sutton (1902) though earlier in the same year Boveri (1902) had referred to a possible connection. In this paper and others Boveri brought forward considerable evidence from the field of experimental embryology indicating that the chromosomes play an important role in development and inheritance. The first attempt at connecting any given somatic character with a definite chromosome came with McClung's (1902) suggestion that the accessory chromosome is a sex-determiner. Stevens (1905) and Wilson (1905) verified this by showing that in numerous forms there is a sex chromosome, present in all the eggs and in the female-producing sperm, but absent, or represented by a smaller homologue, in the male-producing sperm. A further step was made when Morgan (1910) showed that the factor for color in the eyes of the fly Drosophila ampelophila follows the distribution of the sex chromosome already found in the same species by Stevens (1908). Later, on the appearance of a sex-linked wing mutation in Drosophila, Morgan (1910a, 1911) was able to make clear a new point. By crossing white-eyed, long-winged flies to those with red eyes and rudimentary wings (the new sex-linked character) he obtained, in F2, white-eyed, rudimentary-winged flies.

This is ESP-standard formatted text. The parallel between the behavior of the chromosomes in reduction and that of Mendelian factors in segregation was first pointed out by Sutton (1902) though earlier in the same year Boveri (1902) had referred to a possible connection. In this paper and others Boveri brought forward considerable evidence from the field of experimental embryology indicating that the chromosomes play an important role in development and inheritance. The first attempt at connecting any given somatic character with a definite chromosome came with McClung's (1902) suggestion that the accessory chromosome is a sex-determiner. Stevens (1905) and Wilson (1905) verified this by showing that in numerous forms there is a sex chromosome, present in all the eggs and in the female-producing sperm, but absent, or represented by a smaller homologue, in the male-producing sperm. A further step was made when Morgan (1910) showed that the factor for color in the eyes of the fly Drosophila ampelophila follows the distribution of the sex chromosome already found in the same species by Stevens (1908). Later, on the appearance of a sex-linked wing mutation in Drosophila, Morgan (1910a, 1911) was able to make clear a new point. By crossing white-eyed, long-winged flies to those with red eyes and rudimentary wings (the new sex-linked character) he obtained, in F2, white-eyed, rudimentary-winged flies.

Nettie Stevens

Nettie Stevens

This is ESP-standard formatted text. The parallel between the behavior of the chromosomes in reduction and that of Mendelian factors in segregation was first pointed out by Sutton (1902) though earlier in the same year Boveri (1902) had referred to a possible connection. In this paper and others Boveri brought forward considerable evidence from the field of experimental embryology indicating that the chromosomes play an important role in development and inheritance. The first attempt at connecting any given somatic character with a definite chromosome came with McClung's (1902) suggestion that the accessory chromosome is a sex-determiner. Stevens (1905) and Wilson (1905) verified this by showing that in numerous forms there is a sex chromosome, present in all the eggs and in the female-producing sperm, but absent, or represented by a smaller homologue, in the male-producing sperm. A further step was made when Morgan (1910) showed that the factor for color in the eyes of the fly Drosophila ampelophila follows the distribution of the sex chromosome already found in the same species by Stevens (1908). Later, on the appearance of a sex-linked wing mutation in Drosophila, Morgan (1910a, 1911) was able to make clear a new point. By crossing white-eyed, long-winged flies to those with red eyes and rudimentary wings (the new sex-linked character) he obtained, in F2, white-eyed, rudimentary-winged flies.

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Joseph Huddart (1777)

An Account of Persons Who Could Not Distinguish Colours. By Mr. Joseph Huddart, in a Letter to the Rev. Joseph Priestley, LL.D. F. R. S.

Phil. Trans. R. Soc. Lond. January 1, 1777 67:260-265; doi:10.1098/rstl.1777.0015

J. Scott and Michael Lort (1778)

An Account of a Remarkable Imperfection of Sight. In a Letter from J. Scott to the Rev. Mr. Whisson, of Trinity College, Cambridge. Communicated by the Rev. Michael Lort, B. D. F. R. S.

Phil. Trans. R. Soc. Lond. January 1, 1778 68:611-614; doi:10.1098/rstl.1778.0028

ABSTRACT: This is ESP-citation-abstract formatted data. The parallel between the behavior of the chromosomes in reduction and that of Mendelian factors in segregation was first pointed out by Sutton (1902) though earlier in the same year Boveri (1902) had referred to a possible connection. In this paper and others Boveri brought forward considerable evidence from the field of experimental embryology indicating that the chromosomes play an important role in development and inheritance. The first attempt at connecting any given somatic character with a definite chromosome came with McClung's (1902) suggestion that the accessory chromosome is a sex-determiner. Stevens (1905) and Wilson (1905) verified this by showing that in numerous forms there is a sex chromosome, present in all the eggs and in the female-producing sperm, but absent, or represented by a smaller homologue, in the male-producing sperm. A further step was made when Morgan (1910) showed that the factor for color in the eyes of the fly Drosophila ampelophila follows the distribution of the sex chromosome already found in the same species by Stevens (1908).

BLURB: This is ESP-citation-blurb formatted data. The parallel between the behavior of the chromosomes in reduction and that of Mendelian factors in segregation was first pointed out by Sutton (1902) though earlier in the same year Boveri (1902) had referred to a possible connection. In this paper and others Boveri brought forward considerable evidence from the field of experimental embryology indicating that the chromosomes play an important role in development and inheritance. The first attempt at connecting any given somatic character with a definite chromosome came with McClung's (1902) suggestion that the accessory chromosome is a sex-determiner. Stevens (1905) and Wilson (1905) verified this by showing that in numerous forms there is a sex chromosome, present in all the eggs and in the female-producing sperm, but absent, or represented by a smaller homologue, in the male-producing sperm. A further step was made when Morgan (1910) showed that the factor for color in the eyes of the fly Drosophila ampelophila follows the distribution of the sex chromosome already found in the same species by Stevens (1908).

J. Scott and Michael Lort (1778)

An Account of a Remarkable Imperfection of Sight. In a Letter from J. Scott to the Rev. Mr. Whisson, of Trinity College, Cambridge. Communicated by the Rev. Michael Lort, B. D. F. R. S.

Phil. Trans. R. Soc. Lond. January 1, 1778 68:611-614; doi:10.1098/rstl.1778.0028

ABSTRACT: This is ESP-citation-abstract formatted data. The parallel between the behavior of the chromosomes in reduction and that of Mendelian factors in segregation was first pointed out by Sutton (1902) though earlier in the same year Boveri (1902) had referred to a possible connection. In this paper and others Boveri brought forward considerable evidence from the field of experimental embryology indicating that the chromosomes play an important role in development and inheritance. The first attempt at connecting any given somatic character with a definite chromosome came with McClung's (1902) suggestion that the accessory chromosome is a sex-determiner. Stevens (1905) and Wilson (1905) verified this by showing that in numerous forms there is a sex chromosome, present in all the eggs and in the female-producing sperm, but absent, or represented by a smaller homologue, in the male-producing sperm. A further step was made when Morgan (1910) showed that the factor for color in the eyes of the fly Drosophila ampelophila follows the distribution of the sex chromosome already found in the same species by Stevens (1908).

BLURB: This is ESP-citation-blurb formatted data. The parallel between the behavior of the chromosomes in reduction and that of Mendelian factors in segregation was first pointed out by Sutton (1902) though earlier in the same year Boveri (1902) had referred to a possible connection. In this paper and others Boveri brought forward considerable evidence from the field of experimental embryology indicating that the chromosomes play an important role in development and inheritance. The first attempt at connecting any given somatic character with a definite chromosome came with McClung's (1902) suggestion that the accessory chromosome is a sex-determiner. Stevens (1905) and Wilson (1905) verified this by showing that in numerous forms there is a sex chromosome, present in all the eggs and in the female-producing sperm, but absent, or represented by a smaller homologue, in the male-producing sperm. A further step was made when Morgan (1910) showed that the factor for color in the eyes of the fly Drosophila ampelophila follows the distribution of the sex chromosome already found in the same species by Stevens (1908).

J. Scott and Michael Lort (1778)

An Account of a Remarkable Imperfection of Sight. In a Letter from J. Scott to the Rev. Mr. Whisson, of Trinity College, Cambridge. Communicated by the Rev. Michael Lort, B. D. F. R. S.

Phil. Trans. R. Soc. Lond. January 1, 1778 68:611-614; doi:10.1098/rstl.1778.0028

ABSTRACT: This is ESP-citation-abstract formatted data. The parallel between the behavior of the chromosomes in reduction and that of Mendelian factors in segregation was first pointed out by Sutton (1902) though earlier in the same year Boveri (1902) had referred to a possible connection. In this paper and others Boveri brought forward considerable evidence from the field of experimental embryology indicating that the chromosomes play an important role in development and inheritance. The first attempt at connecting any given somatic character with a definite chromosome came with McClung's (1902) suggestion that the accessory chromosome is a sex-determiner. Stevens (1905) and Wilson (1905) verified this by showing that in numerous forms there is a sex chromosome, present in all the eggs and in the female-producing sperm, but absent, or represented by a smaller homologue, in the male-producing sperm. A further step was made when Morgan (1910) showed that the factor for color in the eyes of the fly Drosophila ampelophila follows the distribution of the sex chromosome already found in the same species by Stevens (1908).

BLURB: This is ESP-citation-blurb formatted data. The parallel between the behavior of the chromosomes in reduction and that of Mendelian factors in segregation was first pointed out by Sutton (1902) though earlier in the same year Boveri (1902) had referred to a possible connection. In this paper and others Boveri brought forward considerable evidence from the field of experimental embryology indicating that the chromosomes play an important role in development and inheritance. The first attempt at connecting any given somatic character with a definite chromosome came with McClung's (1902) suggestion that the accessory chromosome is a sex-determiner. Stevens (1905) and Wilson (1905) verified this by showing that in numerous forms there is a sex chromosome, present in all the eggs and in the female-producing sperm, but absent, or represented by a smaller homologue, in the male-producing sperm. A further step was made when Morgan (1910) showed that the factor for color in the eyes of the fly Drosophila ampelophila follows the distribution of the sex chromosome already found in the same species by Stevens (1908).

MendelWeb is an educational resource for teachers and students interested in the origins of classical genetics, introductory data analysis, elementary plant science, and the history and literature of science. Constructed around Gregor Mendel's 1865 paper "Versuche über Pflanzen-Hybriden" and a revised version of the English translation by C. T. Druery and William Bateson, "Experiments in Plant Hybridization", MendelWeb is offered as a public sourcebook and collaborative environment compatible with a variety of guided and independent studies.

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